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How you ask a customer for a review is different in most industries. No matter the field you’re in, however, asking a customer for a review can seem kind of awkward. We know as a business owner, you want your employees to break past this fear of asking, because the more customers they ask, the more reviews your business should get. 

We put together these bullet points anyone asking for reviews should keep in mind when making their pitch. We know a lot of employees hate asking for them, and we hope this can help you make your request a little more natural. 

Before we begin, you should know that 2 Step Reviews is a texting solution used to acquire new reviews online. A best practice with this software is not to blindly just text the customers a review request. We encourage our users to ask the customer first if they’d mind taking the time to leave a review. Then, proceed to ask them for their cell phone number in order to send them the link.

Asking for permission creates more of a bond between the employee and a customer. If the customer is happy with your service and wants to help you, they’ll consider it their duty to take the time to leave you a review if they agreed that they would.

What not to do when asking for a review: 

First, let’s quickly illustrate a poor example of a review request to avoid. It’s kind of hard to mess this up, because you already should know that most people are likely to want to leave you a review if you did a good job. If you don’t know that however, it may come out wrong.

Here’s a bad example on how to ask for a review example: 

Employee: “Hi Mrs. Turner, I’m all done. Can you please leave me a review online?”

Mrs. Turner: “Um, yeah ok. Everything is all set I don’t need to do anything?”

Employee: “Thank You! Yeah I did everything, just call the company if you see any problems and need me to come back.” 

For starters, this is a poor way to end any type of service. But let’s go over why this approach is bad in the case that the employee wants a review: 

  1. Didn’t ask if she was happy with the service
  2. Didn’t suggest where to leave the review
  3. Didn’t give her a path to get to the review page
  4. Didn’t go over why he actually wanted a review.

Now, this type of review-request is obviously poor, so let’s look into the components of the best ways to ask for a review. 

Things to remember when asking a customer to write a review:

  • It’s ok if they don’t want to.

    • If you ask nicely and they say no to leaving you a review, that’s ok. You’re not going to get them all. Most of the “No’s” are predefined, and no matter how well you ask them, they’ll decline.
  • Explain how much time it will take them.

    • For 2 Step Reviews, we always emphasize saying, “Would you mind taking 30 seconds of your time to leave us a review?” Most genuine people will agree to have 30 seconds to spare, and that’s really how long it takes.
  • Make sure they are satisfied and they have no concerns.

    • Saying something like “I’m glad I was able to help, I hope you’re happy with everything, do you have any other questions or concerns?” and following their “No, thank you so much!” You can say: “You’re welcome! If you wouldn’t mind taking 30 quick seconds, I can text you a link to leave me a review. It would be great for the business.”
  • Give assurance that this is only for a review and nothing else.

    • People sometimes don’t want to give out their information because they don’t want to be on your “email list” or something like that. You can add to your invitation, “You’re welcome! If you wouldn’t mind taking 30 quick seconds, I can text you a link where you can leave me a review. It would be great for the business. You won’t be added to any subscription list, this is just to send the review link.”
  • Show gratitude.

    • If they say they will do it, the most obvious thing is to be thankful. “Thank you so much, it means a lot! Have a wonderful rest of your day.” Will go a long way and is the right thing to do if they’re leaving you a review.
  • If you want credit for your review.

    • If you’re rewarding employees for reviews and are tracking them manually, you’ll need the customer to mention their name. This throws a bit of a curveball into asking a customer to leave a review and is one of the obstacles 2 Step Reviews solves with our tracking and leaderboard. How we used to approach getting our employees named mentioned in the review went something like this: “Would you mind taking 30 quick seconds to leave me a review? It would be great if you could mention my name so my boss sees how I’m doing and for the business as a whole.” When the customer sees that you’ll benefit from it, they’re likely to want to help you out if you just really helped them with their problem.

The way you ask customers for reviews is an art. As you approach them more and more, you should practice perfecting your craft. Every customer is different and can be approached at different angles. It’s important to remain consistent in being respectful and showing appreciation to them if they would take time out their lives to help you out.

2 Step Reviews Gives You The Confidence to Ask For Reviews

2 Step Reviews takes the awkwardness and uncertainty out of generating a review. The text-to-review technique is the leading way for businesses to get more Google reviews. This is all because of the ease of use for customers to get there. If you’d like to learn more about our software and the benefits it will bring you, schedule a demo with us today.